Getting Through Divorce Negotiations Without a Fight

In spite of promises to work together and place your own needs aside for the sake of your children, it is not unusual for an uncontested divorce to quickly become contested and downright hostile. Once a couple finds themselves unable to agree on one or more major issues, they must begin negotiating with the help of their attorneys, mediators, and in some cases the judge. Since a family court judge is not always willing to listen to what each side feels is important, letting a dispute go on for too long can lead to the judge making a decision with which no one is happy.  Working together towards a compromise is the only way to keep your divorce in your hands and that means you must be able to get through divorce negotiations without fighting. Continue reading

Three Ways to Ruin Your Divorce Settlement

In most contested divorce scenarios, each partner feels that he or she is in the right and that any settlement agreement should favor him or her. A family law judge will focus on hearing relevant information and making a fair judgment according to the facts of the case. Unfortunately, some divorcing adults take matters into their own hands hoping to find a way to guarantee that the judge favors them. When you or someone you know attempts to find a way to tip the scales in your favor, it is possible that you will instead find a way to completely ruin your divorce settlement. Continue reading

Preparing for a Military Divorce

Getting a divorce is never easy, but being an active duty service member or retired veteran adds complications to an already difficult process. The unique circumstances often surrounding the end of a marriage when one partner is, or was, in the military require specialized knowledge and extra preparation. If you or someone close to you is preparing for a military divorce, it is important to educate yourself regarding certain factors that can seriously impact your divorce settlement. Failing to consult an attorney who understands military divorce could create a situation in which you do not have the representation of an advocate who is truly able to act in your best interest. Continue reading

Repercussions of Moving out of Your Marital Home

Once you or your spouse has decided to file for a divorce, living together may become uncomfortable. Regardless of the length of a marriage, it is difficult to adjust to sharing a home with a person who is no longer your legal spouse, especially if you are locked in a legal battle for assets or child custody. Leaving the marital home is often the choice one partner makes in order to keep the peace and avoid confrontations. While establishing a separate household gives you a way to get away from a spouse you can no longer tolerate, there are potential repercussions when you move out of your marital home before your divorce is complete.

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Consequences of Hiding Assets During a Divorce

Dividing assets is one of the most complicated aspects of the divorce process. No matter how amicable a couple plans to be at the beginning of their separation, the idea of sharing property and money can bring out the worst in the best of people. Though most adults depend on their attorneys to handle these negotiations, it is not unusual for one spouse to decide to take matters into his or her own hands. Even when warned about the potential consequences of hiding assets, a person who resents his or her spouse, or who feels he or she cannot afford a fair division may still attempt to conceal property or money. It is important to understand the consequences of attempting to hide assets during a divorce. Continue reading

Parental Rights and Responsibilities After Divorce

Are you considering a divorce, but unsure of the legal impact this action will have on your relationship with your child? Are you worried about losing your decision-making ability when it comes to issues regarding your child? Do you feel lost as you try to make sense of legalese related to parental rights and the responsibilities of divorced parents? The experienced legal team at the Lawrence Law Office can help you to maneuver through the challenge of a divorce, and all of the legal implications that it entails for you, the co-parent, and your child. Continue reading

Avoid Sabotaging Your Chances for Custody

Separating from a domestic partner or spouse is usually a painful process, and most adults want to get through it as quickly as possible. Unfortunately, when children are involved, the separation process can be more prolonged and contentious. Both parties often hope for custody of their child for emotional, personal, and (in some cases) financial reasons. Throughout a custody battle, both parents are scrutinized by the court since a judge or neutral mediator are primarily interested in what placement would be in the child’s best interest. During your fight for custody, it is important to avoid sabotaging your custody chances, as any mistake on your part may be used against you by your ex-spouse’s attorney or viewed negatively by a judge. The following are examples of ways that you could accidentally sabotage your case. Continue reading

Who Gets What: Dividing the Little Things

Courts are well versed in assisting couples in dividing their marital assets. There is law and substantial case law that informs how the marital home, automobiles, 401k plans, pensions, retirement accounts, bank accounts, businesses or business interests, and brokerage accounts get divided among the divorcing spouses. While a difficult process, the outcome is a fair distribution of the marital assets. Continue reading

Property Division and Divorce in Ohio

When it comes to divorce, every state’s laws regarding asset division are a little bit different. Property and assets are divided under what is either community property laws or marital property laws. Community property classifies property acquired by either spouse or both during the period of marriage to be jointly owned, with the same amount of interest between them. While the couple retains separate interest in the assets or property they held prior to the marriage, a court will view property acquired during marriage as a 50/50 division. Laws surrounding community property are following in nine states, including Arizona, California, Texas, Idaho, Louisiana, Nevada, New Mexico, Washington, and Wisconsin. Continue reading

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